sproutbabe:

kumagawa:

when the supporting cast is more interesting than the main character of a series

image

image

(via vantsass)

yourladyganja:

*swoons*

(Source: leawrences, via assbirth)

causeallidoisdance:

piecesofamoonchyld:

Recently Kaige told us he wishes he could be both a boy and a girl because he likes playing princesses as much as ninjas and he doesn’t want to get made fun of. So we bought him a tutu and gave him a makeover. Meet the new and improved Kaige. If you have a problem with it please keep it to yourself and kindly stay out of his life. Which would be a shame because as you can see he’s freakin’ awesome! #letmebeme #mumblr #stopbullying

WHAT A FUCKING RAD KID WITH RAD HAIR

I'm a bit confused on your views of transgender rights issues. Do you equate sex to gender?

radfemale:

actually the opposite???

sex is biological and gender is socially constructed. males are not innately masculine, as females are not innately feminine. some trans women ‘feel like a woman’ because they don’t fit the (false) patriarchal description of ‘man’. we need to get rid of that gender binary so we can end misogyny, end the harm gender stereotypes put on our biological sex, and end people feel ostracised from their own sex due to ‘not fitting in’. 

Anonymous ↓

ur gay

bdsm-harms-women:

nerdymouse:

Yet they claim that the queer community is overly sexual and puts our sex lives out there. Straight people are weird. 

ew gross

enforcing heterosexuality for one thing and putting sexualized abuse bullshit on your fucking baby???? wtf is wrong with you people

Anonymous ↓

I am all about ship and let ship. But I really just don't understand how people are able to ship both Gremma and SQ. It kinda puts me in knots. (and that's ignoring the recent thing in Graham's tag where someone only understands Evil Huntsman, Graham/Regina/Emma, or SQ because it's "hotter" ... idk, man)

ouatqueer-antisq:

I don’t understand that either, darling.

And any Regina/Graham relationship described as ‘hot’ makes me ill.  It’s rape.

Central to pro-sex thought is the idea that there is a plethora of sexual preferences and practices which profoundly violate societal re­strictions. Among these restricted sexual activities—which are seen as wildly divergent—are cross-generational sex (to use their euphemism for child sexual abuse), fetishism, sadomasochism, and the making and use of pornography. Such deviant sexualities, so the theory goes, are at the bottom of a hierarchy of sexual privilege, which has heterosex­uality, marriage, and procreation at its pinnacle, and “vanilla” homo­sexuality somewhere in the middle. “Those engaging in these privi­leged acts,” Carol Vance writes in her introduction to Pleasure and Danger, “enjoy good name and good fortune.”

All of this sounds logical and persuasive until you move beyond society’s pieties and look at what it actually practices. Then it becomes clear that, instead of being forbidden or persecuted, these frowned upon sexual activities are, in the case of men, promoted, encouraged, and rewarded, and, in the case of women, imposed and enforced. More­over, instead of being incredibly different from one another, they all have a common denominator: a power relationship that replicates in miniature the power relations of society.


— Dorchen Leidholdt, ‘When Women Defend Pornography’, The Sexual Liberals and the Attack on Feminism  (via fucknopornblogs)

(Source: ultraleftist, via fucknopornblogs)

darkskinnedblackbeauty:

January Y0Da Photography

(via allbeautifulblackgirls)

kenobi-wan-obi:

"Race doesn’t matter!" , "Isn’t science just science?! why bring race into it!!", "It is not about the colour of skin!" meanwhile in the real world:

Is There a Bias Against Black Scientists? Funding Sparse for Minority Researchers

Black researchers and other minorities face nearly insurmountable barriers against career success, according to new research.

A February 2014 article in the Journal of Career Development details the work experiences of minority researchers in the social sciences.

Rebecca R. Kameny of the 3-C Institute for Social Development in North Carolina, directed the study, which collected data from people of color who attended a workshop on the topic of career barriers.

An astounding 72 percent of participants reported encountering workplace barriers due to their race or ethnicity.

Racism: A Sad History

Bias against minority researchers is not a new subject. In 2011, Donna K. Ginthner and her associates published a study about the NIH and grants to minority researchers. (The NIH, or National Institute of Health, is a government agency that serves as one of the prime supporters of scientific research.)

The Ginther study examined the rates at which grants were given to 83,000 researchers. Unfortunately, they found that the funding agency is biased against African Americans who submitted grant applications. According to the study, blacks are 13% less likely than equally-qualified white candidates to receive funding that is initiated by an NIH investigator.

The study’s writers explained that the researchers’ race is not always written on the application, but the applications’ reviewers could infer race from the applicants’ names and places of study. Without receiving federal funding, a researcher is less likely to receive a teaching position, less likely to be given tenure, and has more difficulty procuring funding to produce research and publish in scholarly journals. Ultimately, the repercussions of grant refusal are reflected in the face of academia.

When the study was published, the director of the NIH noted that the data is troubling and the situation is unacceptable. The NIH launched a $500 million, 10-year program to support young minorities in science. It is also considering changing its review process to review grant proposals anonymously to prevent this issue in the future.

Bias Against Blacks: Misinterpreted Data?

A 2013 study published in the Journal of Informetrics, however, contradicts the premise of bias against black researchers. The study, led by Jiansheng Yang of Virginia Tech, paints a different picture, concluding that the NIH review process contains no inherent racial bias.

Yang and his associates reviewed the work of 40 black faculty members and 80 white faculty members at U.S. medical schools. They assessed the scientists’ productivity, based on the number of publications they wrote, their role on each paper, and the prominence of the journals in which they published. Overall, Wang’s team found that the black faculty members were less productive than their white colleagues.

The researchers then reviewed the work of 11 of those black researchers and 11 of those white researchers who had received NIH funding. When they compared blacks and whites who had the same level of productivity, they found that people of both races received the same level of NIH funding. Wang concluded that funding is determined by level of success, and not by race.

Not Apples to Apples

Ginther, who found ample evidence of the NIH’s racial bias, argued in Science that Wang did not study the same aspects of the process that she did, so he cannot refute her claim. She noted that Wang’s study examined only a small number of researchers, and also looked only at how much funding they received, instead of whether they had a chance of receiving funding in the first place.

Ginther also noted that the black scientists’ lower level of productivity pointed to their difficulty in receiving positive mentoring, which is a further function of bias.

Discrimination is Not Dead

It seems that a majority of African Americans would agree with Ginther’s point about bias. A 2013 Pew Research study about discrimination in America found that a full 88% of blacks reported that there is discrimination against blacks. 46 % believe that there is a lot of discrimination, and the rest report feeling some discrimination.

Interestingly, white Americans agree that blacks are discriminated against, but to a lesser degree. Only 16% of whites feel that there is a lot of discrimination, but 41% sense some discrimination.

Regardless of percentages and perceptions, race-based barriers to success have no place in academia or the workplace.

(via lookatthewords)

What’s it like to work alongside so many other women of color?

(Source: jasonnywithnochance, via marysburgers)

(Source: the-monae, via shannonantoine)

shannonantoine:

This is precious. Raven Symone is adorbs.